Our Blog

What do you love about our practice?

November 16th, 2022

At Central New England Endodontics and Implantology, we have been creating beautiful smiles for years. Whether you or your family have visited Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants and our team for a single visit or have been loyal patients throughout the years, we would love to hear your thoughts about your experience! In fact, we encourage you to leave a few words for us below or on our Facebook page!

We look forward to reading your feedback!

Oral Diseases and How You Can Avoid Them

November 9th, 2022

While modern dental science has made remarkable advances in treating oral diseases, prevention is always better than cure. To keep our mouth, gums, and teeth their healthiest, there are some simple practices we can follow to dramatically reduce dram the risk of developing some of the most common oral diseases.

Tooth Decay

We don’t usually think of tooth decay as a disease, but it is, in fact, the most common chronic disease in older children and adolescents. A great majority of adults have had at least some experience with decay. Left untreated, tooth decay can lead to pain, infection, tooth loss, and even loss of nearby bone in the jaw. Luckily, there are several time-tested ways to prevent cavities:

  • Brush properly at least twice a day. Ask Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants for the best toothbrush for your individual needs (usually, a soft brush is best), the best technique for angling the brush to reach all of each tooth’s surfaces, and the amount of time you should spend brushing.
  • Floss daily. Even with perfect brushing form, you are going to want to use floss to clean between the teeth and around the gum line.
  • Use a fluoride toothpaste. Study after study has shown that the risk of cavities is reduced with regular use of a fluoride toothpaste or rinse.
  • Watch your diet. Foods high in sugar and simple carbohydrates give cavity-causing bacteria the fuel they need to produce the acids which weaken enamel. On the other hand, a diet rich in protein, vitamins, and minerals is beneficial not only for your teeth, but for your whole body!
  • See your dentist for regular checkups to find small problems and prevent them from becoming major ones. Your dentist can also give you tips on better oral hygiene if your brushing and flossing habits aren’t doing the job.

Gum Disease

Preventing gum disease is a lot like preventing tooth decay—your daily habits really make a difference. When plaque builds up around the teeth and gums, the bacteria in plaque cause gum tissue to become inflamed, swollen, and painful. Left untreated, the gums pull away from the teeth, leaving pockets where bacteria collect and lead to infection. Infections harm not only gum tissue, but can destroy the bone which supports the teeth. What can you do to prevent gum disease?

  • Use proper brushing technique. Remember to angle the brush toward the gums to gently clean around and below the gum line.
  • Floss daily—flossing removes particles and plaque between the teeth, and it also helps remove plaque from the area under the gum line.
  • Smokers are at higher risk for gum disease, and smoking has been linked to slower healing. Giving up tobacco products of any kind is always a good way to protect your dental health.
  • Regular dental exams will catch gingivitis (early gum disease) while it is still reversible. Periodontitis (serious gum disease) can require treatment by a specialist. Certain diseases such as diabetes increase the risk of developing gum disease, so checkups are especially important.
  • Having your teeth cleaned every six months, or as recommended, will remove plaque that brushing alone can’t handle. If there are signs of more serious gum disease, a periodontal cleaning will remove plaque and tartar from both above and below the gum line.

How Can Your Endodontist Help?

Endodontists like Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants have the advanced education and training not only to treat several oral diseases, but to help repair the damage they can cause. Endodontists are experts in such procedures as:

  • Root canals—your first option for preserving your tooth when the inner pulp has been damaged or infected
  • Surgeries which allow access to tiny root fractures and canals, calcium deposits, or damaged roots and bone which can’t be reached non-surgically
  • Apicoectomies, which treats recurring pain and infection by removing the tip of the root and any inflamed or infected tissue, then cleaning and resealing the root
  • Endodontic surgeries such as root resections, which retain as much of the natural tooth as possible when a tooth is too damaged for normal restorations
  • Implant surgery to provide a permanent, natural looking replacement for a lost tooth

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, and when it comes to your dental health, there’s a lot you can do to prevent oral diseases. But should you need endodontic treatment at our Worcester office, we have the knowledge and experience you need. After all, you can’t weigh the worth of your oral health—that’s priceless!

Don't brush after EVERY meal!

November 9th, 2022

This may come as a surprise, but brushing your teeth right after a meal can be one of the worst things you can do for your healthy teeth. A toothbrush can be considered an assault weapon against your smile if used immediately after eating certain foods.

Enamel is like the tooth’s shield. It is a hard mineral exterior on each of your teeth. In reality, enamel is the hardest part of the human body—even stronger than bone! I like to regard it as a “super-structure.” But every superhero has a weakness, and enamel’s kryptonite is acid.

A healthy tooth lives in a mouth that has a proper pH balance. When that balance tips from alkaline to acidic, a harmful process called demineralization begins. Demineralization occurs when acids attack and soften the tooth surface. Pores and fissures form and harmful bacteria move in.

With each bite of food or drink, our mouth pH fluctuates. Highly acidic foods tip the balance of your mouth from a healthy alkaline to a dangerous acid. Here are some examples of those sources of acid: citrus fruits, soda, and sugary foods. There are certainly many others, but these are the most common.

So how does brushing your teeth immediately after a meal make this process even worse?

After eating highly acidic foods, your teeth are susceptible to damage. When you brush your teeth in this weakened state you are actually damaging your enamel. The abrasive bristles of the brush wear away the protective surface of the teeth. You should avoid brushing for at least an hour, or take other, simple preventive measures immediately following a meal.

First, rinse with or drink clear water. Then chew some sugarless gum. Both of these practices will produce saliva, restore a healthy pH level in your mouth, and coat your teeth with nourishing minerals. Out of all the sugarless gums available, the best of the best are those that list xylitol as the first ingredient. Another option is to consume cheese, milk, or another non-acidic food or drink to conclude your meal.

After you have given your mouth time to return to a healthy pH, feel free to brush your teeth. Just keep in mind that any time you eat acidic foods, you weaken your teeth. Make sure not to worsen the problem by brushing immediately after dining and damaging your teeth even more. Questions? Call us at Central New England Endodontics and Implantology.

Discovering Your Roots

November 2nd, 2022

Getting to the Root of the Problem

While our roots are well-protected, they’re not indestructible! Several conditions can damage them. But we’re not just about problems—we also have some suggestions to keep your roots solid and intact for a lifetime.

  • Traumatic Injury

A blow, a fall from a bike, a sports injury—any trauma which can hurt your visible tooth can hurt your roots as well. And it’s not just accidents that cause harm. Cracks in the tooth caused by oral habits like chewing on ice, pencils, or other hard objects can lead to root fractures.

You can help prevent root injuries by wearing a mouth guard whenever you are engaged in contact sports or any physical activity that might cause damage to your face or mouth. If you have harmful oral habits, talk to Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants about how to break them. And if you do suffer a dental injury, see us as soon as possible to avoid more serious complications.

  • Bruxism

Bruxism, or tooth grinding, is most often an unconscious habit that takes place while you sleep. Grinding puts enormous pressure on teeth and their roots. The damage can be obvious, with cracked and worn crowns, but your roots can be affected, too. The strain of this constant pressure can stretch the periodontal ligament, causing loose teeth.

Night guards are one of the easiest ways to relieve pressure on individual teeth and roots. Your dentist can fabricate a night guard which will provide comfortable, effective protection for your teeth and jaw.

  • Gum Recession

Taking care of your gums is one of the best ways to protect your roots.

Gums often recede as we age, leaving part of the root exposed. Gum disease, failure to brush and floss regularly, and heavy-handed brushing can also lead to gum recession. The newly revealed cementum is now exposed to the plaque and acids which cause cavities in our enamel, and, since it’s not as strong as enamel, cementum is more vulnerable to erosion and cavities progress more quickly.

When more severe recession takes place, the gums pull away from the teeth, creating pockets which become home to plaque and bacteria. Left untreated, infection and inflammation can develop, attacking teeth, connective tissue, and bone. Talk to Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants about scaling and planing procedures for a deep cleaning of the root surface, or grafting procedures to replace the gum tissue which protects your roots.

  • Infected or Injured Roots

An endodontist is a specialist in diagnosing and treating conditions affecting the inner tooth and its surrounding tissues. To specialize in this field, endodontists have two or more years of additional advanced training in procedures designed to save your natural teeth.

Any infection or trauma which injures the pulp of the tooth will affect the roots as well. Most of us are familiar with root canal treatment, where infected or damaged pulp is removed, and the insides of the pulp chamber and canals are cleaned, shaped, and filled. A crown is usually placed afterward to cap and protect the tooth.  Endodontists are specialists in root canal treatment, saving teeth which would otherwise be lost.

Endodontists are also trained in surgical procedures which treat persistent root pain and infection:

  • When infections recur near the tip of a root after a root canal, an apicoectomy is the most common surgical treatment. In this procedure, your endodontist will carefully remove a few millimeters from the tip of the tooth, then clean the infected parts of the tooth and the tissues around it before sealing the root tip.
  • If a single root in a molar with multiple roots is seriously damaged, decayed, or infected, your endodontist might recommend a root amputation. Here the damaged root is surgically removed, preserving the remaining roots and crown. If the crown is damaged as well, your endodontist can perform a hemisection, removing the root and part of the crown to save as much as possible of the molar.
  • When the reason for your discomfort is unclear, diagnostic surgery can find the cause of persistent pain when a tooth fracture or root canal branch is so small that even an X-ray doesn’t reveal it.

Healthy roots help you keep your teeth for a lifetime, so it’s important to see Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants as soon as possible if you have any symptoms of potential problems:

  • Constant pain in tooth, gums, or jaw
  • Pain when biting down
  • Loose teeth
  • Tooth discoloration
  • Sensitivity to hot and cold
  • Swelling or pain in the gums around a tooth

Do your part by keeping up with daily brushing and flossing, seeing your dentist for exams as recommended, and making an appointment at our Worcester office if you are feeling any pain or discomfort. Strong roots are essential to our oral health, and a lifetime of healthy smiles is something we’re all rooting for!