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Good Dental Hygiene Impacts Overall General Health

October 21st, 2020

There are many ways in which your oral health has an impact on your overall general health. There are naturally occurring bacteria in the mouth. Some of those bacteria, including strep and staph, are harmful, while other bacteria are essential for the balance of intestinal flora. The healthier your mouth is, the less likely it is the harmful bacteria will travel to other parts of your body to infect it and make you sick. There is much more to good dental hygiene than brushing and flossing.

Historical Methods of Maintaining Oral Health

Ancient civilizations relied on natural remedies for maintaining oral health. Around 250 AD, the Kemetic Egyptians used myrrh and other herbs as antiseptics for treating infected gums. Two centuries later, the Nubians, who lived in the Nile River valley, drank beer to ease the pain of infected teeth. That probably sounds crazy, but their beer was effective because they used grains that were contaminated with the same bacteria that produce the antibiotic tetracycline.

Today's Biggest Dental Hygiene Challenge

In the past, tooth decay was more of an issue because there was no routine dental care, and problems that are routinely treated today went untreated. Thanks to fluoridated water, and toothpastes containing fluoride, tooth decay is far less problematic than it was a century or more ago. Gum disease has replaced tooth decay as the most serious dental problem facing people today. According to the American Dental Association, a staggering 80 percent of Americans over age 65 suffer from some form of periodontal disease.

Ironically, if that infection attacked any other part of your body, especially in a place where it was clearly visible, you would head to your doctor for treatment immediately. People tend to ignore gum tenderness and bleeding. When the tenderness and bleeding aren't treated, the inflammation can turn into periodontitis. The longer you allow the inflammation to go untreated, the greater the likelihood that it will affect other body parts. Make sure to visit Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants at Central New England Endodontics and Implantology regularly to be proactive about dental health!

Researchers are now discovering that untreated inflammation in the mouth acts as a driving force for multiple chronic illnesses, including clogged arteries, heart attacks, arthritis, and even cancer. That inflammation is one of many hypotheses that may explain how chronic infections can trigger systemic diseases, and even intensify existing ones. Bacterial overgrowth in the inflamed gum tissue can enter the bloodstream through the food you eat, and from daily brushing.

Caring for your mouth at home is just as important as visiting our office for exams!

Oral Health during Pregnancy

October 14th, 2020

Pregnancy can be one of the most exciting times in a woman’s life, as you eagerly wait for the birth of the new addition. Needless to say, pregnancy comes with a lot of responsibilities. Everything you do to your own body can affect your baby’s health, so you eat right and try to avoid anything that could harm your baby.

You may not realize it, but even your oral health affects your baby. You have a lot to worry about during this time in your life, but it’s important not to let your oral health slide. Maintaining good routines before and during pregnancy can improve the health of your baby.

Gum Disease and Pregnancy

Gum disease includes gingivitis and the more severe condition called periodontitis. Pregnancy gingivitis is a condition that results from bacteria in your teeth. Symptoms include gum inflammation and bad breath. If it progresses to periodontitis, your baby is at higher risk for preterm delivery and low-birth weight. You can also develop pregnancy tumors, or pyogenic granulomas, which can interfere with speaking and eating. Throughout pregnancy, continue to visit Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants at your regularly scheduled appointments to look for signs of gum disease.

Pregnancy and the Role of Our Office

Make an appointment with Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants at our Worcester office when you first learn that you’re pregnant, especially if you have unresolved oral health issues. If possible, try not to schedule necessary treatment during the first trimester or second half of the third trimester.

Oral Health Care Habits to Follow

Maintain a normal good oral health care regimen, which includes brushing your teeth at least twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste and soft toothbrush, and flossing daily. If your regular regimen is not up to par, now is a good time to develop good habits. You can use an unflavored toothpaste if you have morning sickness and regular toothpaste makes you feel nauseous. Also, rinse your mouth with water or mouthwash if you experience morning sickness to prevent acid damage to your teeth.

Should Adults Continue Fluoride Treatments?

September 30th, 2020

Many adults wonder if they should continue to receive fluoride treatments. Our team at Central New England Endodontics and Implantology wants to set the record straight about the usefulness of fluoride treatment for adults.

There are several reasons fluoride treatments could be beneficial to you as a grownup. If you have a high risk for cavities, topical fluoride applications can cut down on that risk.

If you’re experiencing gum recession that’s softening your enamel, fluoride treatments can slow down that process. Fluoride treatments may also protect expensive restorative work on crowns or bridges that may be adversely affected by plaque.

In addition, fluoride can also protect teeth in adults who have orthodontic braces or who sometimes neglect to keep up with daily oral hygiene regimens such as flossing and using mouthwash.

Do you have sensitive teeth? Consuming foods that are highly acidic or using teeth-whitening products can lead to irritated gums. Fluoride treatments remineralize your enamel and reduce sensitivity.

If you’ve undergone radiation treatment for cancer, fluoride can help restore any dry-mouth damage that may have developed during that time. Saliva acts as a buffer against the foods we eat, and without enough of it you may be more likely to get cavities.

In general, fluoride treatments are not always necessary for adults, but they can be beneficial to your overall oral hygiene depending on your situation. If you fall into one of the general areas listed above, ask about a fluoride treatment during your next visit at our Worcester office.

We can also go over your options to treat other issues you may experience in terms of your oral health. Until then, make sure to take care of your teeth properly and use toothpaste or mouthwash that contains fluoride on a regular basis.

How to Choose the Best Mouthwash

September 23rd, 2020

As we all know, or should by now, the key to maintaining great oral health is keeping up with a daily plan of flossing, brushing, and using mouthwash. These three practices in combination will help you avoid tooth decay and keep bacterial infections at bay.

At Central New England Endodontics and Implantology, we’ve noticed that it’s usually not the toothbrush or floss that people have trouble picking, but the mouthwash.

Depending on the ingredients, different mouthwashes will have different effects on your oral health. Here are some ideas to take under consideration when you’re trying to decide which type of mouthwash will best fit your needs.

  • If gum health is your concern, antiseptic mouthwashes are designed to reduce bacteria near the gum line.
  • If you drink a lot of bottled water, you may want to consider a fluoride rinse to make sure your teeth develop the level of strength they need.
  • Generally, any mouthwash will combat bad breath, but some are especially designed to do so.
  • Opt for products that are ADA approved, to ensure you aren’t exposing your teeth to harmful chemicals.
  • If you experience an uncomfortable, burning sensation when you use a wash, stop it and try another!

Still have questions about mouthwash? Feel free to ask Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants during your next visit to our Worcester office! We’re always happy to answer your questions. Happy rinsing!

If You Have Dental Anxiety, Let’s Talk About Your Sedation Options

September 16th, 2020

Sometimes people feel a tiny bit nervous when they sit in the dental chair. And sometimes it’s more than a tiny bit. If your anxiety over dental procedures is leading you to postpone the root canal that can save your tooth, if worrying about an apicoectomy outweighs treating a recurring infection, if dreading endodontic surgery means you would rather live with tooth loss than give us a call—give our Worcester office a call! Sedation dentistry might be just the procedure you need to make dental anxiety a thing of the past.

Depending on your preferences, there are several levels of sedation Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants can provide to make your visit more comfortable.

  • Minimal Sedation—this type of sedation leaves you calm and conscious, and you respond normally to verbal directions.
  • Moderate Sedation—sometimes called “conscious sedation,” this option will leave you awake, relaxed and able to follow directions, but you will probably have little memory of the procedure afterward.
  • Deep Sedation—a deeper level of sedation where you cannot be roused easily or respond to instructions. It is unlikely you will remember much or any of the dental treatment.

Our office is trained to administer and monitor all these forms of sedation. Because sedation in all its varieties is a regular part of our practice, we have the medical knowledge and skill to provide you with a safe and comfortable endodontic experience.

And we will prepare you with all the information you need to decide on any endodontic treatment, including sedation. We will describe the procedure in detail, and discuss any possible risks. If you have any health conditions or take any medications that might interfere with sedation, we can discuss your options with you and your doctor to make sure you are a good candidate. We will explain any preparations you should take, and let you know if there is a window of recovery time needed in our office while the sedation wears off.

Don’t let yourself suffer dental pain or discomfort because you suffer from dental anxiety! Please call us to discuss your sedation options. Whether you choose oral, inhaled, or IV sedation, we are trained to administer your treatment gently and safely. Above all, we want to help you keep your smile the heathiest it can be, and that only happens with proper dental care. Let us work with you to make that care as comfortable and stress-free as possible.

Does Your Child Need Endodontic Treatment?

September 9th, 2020

Baby teeth come with a built-in expiration date. That charming first smile is meant to make way for a healthy, beautiful adult smile. Unfortunately, before they are ready to make way for permanent teeth, primary teeth can be affected by decay, trauma, or infection—problems which can lead to damage to the pulp within the tooth. If your dentist tells you that your child’s tooth needs specialized endodontic treatment, is treatment really that much better for your child than losing a baby tooth prematurely?

Quite often, the answer is yes!

Baby teeth do much more than serve as temporary stand-ins for adult teeth. They are essential for:

  • Biting and chewing—a full set of baby teeth helps your child develop proper chewing, which leads to healthy digestion. And chewing also helps build face and jaw muscles.
  • Speech development—primary teeth help guide speech production and pronunciation.
  • Spacing—a baby tooth serves as a place holder for the adult tooth waiting to arrive. If a primary tooth is lost too early, the remaining baby teeth may drift from their proper location. This, in turn, can cause overcrowding or misalignment of the permanent teeth when they do erupt.

Baby teeth, like adult teeth, contain living pulp tissue. The pulp chamber inside the crown (the visible part of the tooth) and the root canals (inside each root) hold nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue. When the pulp is damaged by trauma or infected, a baby tooth can still be saved with endodontic treatment. Endodontic treatment in baby teeth can take two forms.

  • “Vital” pulp is pulp that can be saved. Vital pulp therapy uses procedures to deal with damaged pulp inside the crown, or visible part, of the tooth. Pulp therapy can be used on teeth when only the top of the pulp has been affected by decay, limited exposure, infection, or trauma, but the root pulp remains healthy. Specific treatment will depend on the nature of the pulp injury, and a crown will usually be placed over the tooth after treatment to protect it.
  • With non-vital pulp, your dentist will probably recommend a traditional root canal procedure. All of the pulp tissue will be removed from inside the crown and the roots, and the pulp chamber and root canals will then be cleaned, disinfected, shaped, and filled. Finally, because the treated tooth will be more fragile, a crown will be used to protect the tooth from further damage.

There can be good reasons for extracting a seriously damaged baby tooth, and there are situations where preserving the tooth is the best and healthiest option for your child. Discuss your options with Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants when you visit our Worcester office for the safest, most effective way to treat your child’s compromised tooth.

When Should I See an Endodontist?

August 26th, 2020

Your teeth generally give you no reason to complain. In fact, brushing and flossing regularly for tooth and gum health, getting good check-ups, and appreciating your beautiful smile in your latest selfie are all very positive experiences. But sometimes, a tooth demands attention in a less than positive way.

When exposure to hot and cold foods causes discomfort, or your gums are swollen and tender around a tooth, or when you can’t bite down without pain, it might mean that the pulp or roots of your tooth have been injured or infected. If your regular dentist suspects there is a problem inside your tooth, he or she might recommend that you see an endodontist, like Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants.

“Endodontic” means “inside the tooth,” and refers to the pulp and roots within each tooth that hold tissue, nerves, and blood vessels. While all dentists receive some endodontic training in dental school, to specialize in this field, endodontists receive two or three years of additional advanced training. Here they concentrate on the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and injuries that affect the inner tooth and its supporting tissue.

Damage to the tooth’s pulp can be the result of an injury, such as a blow to the mouth. A chip, a crack, or a deep cavity can leave an opening for infection. Whatever the cause of injury or inflammation, once the pulp and roots have been compromised, treatment needs to take place to prevent further infection, pain, and even tooth loss. Endodontists work to save injured teeth with a variety of procedures, including root canals, treatment of injuries caused by trauma, and endodontic surgeries.

If you have a compromised tooth, or if you have oral or facial pain that is difficult to find an explanation for, talk to Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants about specialized endodontic treatment at our Worcester office. Saving a tooth is, after all, one of the most important ways to preserve our smiles. And that’s nothing but positive!

Hypersensitive Teeth

August 19th, 2020

It is common to experience dentine hypersensitivity, with symptoms ranging from moderate to severe. Why does it happen and how do you know if this sensitivity is something to be concerned about? The first step is to determine the cause.

The most common cause of the sensitivity is exposure of the dentin. Dentin is the layer immediately surrounding the nerve of the tooth. It is alive and usually covered by the gum tissue. When gum recession is present hypersensitivity is common. Other contributors to temporary tooth hypersensitivity include teeth whitening and dental procedures such as fillings, periodontal treatment, and braces placement or adjustment. These are temporary and should be of no concern.

Permanent hypersensitivity, however, may require treatment. To understand the cause of sustained hypersensitivity, let us explain the structure of dentin and why it serves as a ‘hot spot’.

The dentin contains a large numbers of pores or tubes that run from the outside of the tooth to the nerve in the center. When dentin tubes are exposed, there is a direct connection between the mouth and dental pulp, which houses the nerve and blood supply of the tooth. External stimuli, such as mechanical pressure (tooth grinding or clenching - bruising the ligaments holding the teeth in place), temperature changes, as well as chemical stimuli (sweet–sour) are transmitted to the pain-sensitive dental pulp and activate nerve endings. A short and sharp pain is the result. These external stimuli cause fluid movement in the open tube that is transmitted as pain sensations. Something needs to be placed into the dentin tube to plug it and stop this fluid movement.

The first step in doing something about dental hypersensitivity is to determine the cause; our professional team at Central New England Endodontics and Implantology can help you with this. Whether the sensitivity is due to exposed dentin or an underlying cause such as abscess or decay, corrective measures are needed. Contact us sooner rather than later so Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants can reduce the sensitivity, and provide you with some relief!

Can all teeth be treated endodontically?

August 12th, 2020

Advancements in dental treatment, and in dental training, have made it possible for specialized dentists, called endodontists, to treat inflammation and infection deep within the core of a tooth. Endodontists, like Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants, receive two additional years of specialized training beyond dental school, where they learn the sophisticated techniques needed to treat problems related to the inside of the tooth. Historically, the only solution for problems within the tooth was to extract the tooth. Today, people who eat a healthier diet have better oral health. They also take better care of their teeth and have regular dental checkups and twice yearly cleanings, all of which contribute to better oral health. Sometimes, however, unforeseen problems arise, and a tooth gets injured, or somehow becomes infected or inflamed. This leads to the need for endodontic treatment.

Understanding Tooth Anatomy

Understanding basic tooth anatomy will put things in proper perspective. The tooth is composed of several parts. The outer layer consists of the enamel and the hard layer called dentin. These layers protect the inside of the tooth, which has a canal that extends from the very top (crown) of the tooth all the way down to the roots. Surrounding that canal is soft tissue known as the pulp. The pulp contains the "guts" of the tooth — or the living parts. Those living parts include blood vessels, connective tissues, and nerves.

Importance of Tooth Pulp

The pulp is most important when your teeth are developing. It connects the area from the top of the tooth to the roots, and then to the supporting tissues around the roots (or gums). Once teeth are fully mature, they can still survive without the pulp because as long as the surrounding tissue is healthy, it continues to nourish the tooth.

Can all teeth be treated endodontically?

Most infections benefit from endodontic treatment. The only reason that a tooth can't be treated endodontically is when the tooth itself isn't salvageable. That might include the inability to access the root canal, a severe fracture of the tooth root, inadequate bone support, or a damaged tooth that can't be restored. Endodontic surgery might be a viable alternative treatment.

Although endodontic treatment is sometimes inevitable and unavoidable, good oral hygiene keeps the teeth, mouth and entire oral cavity in good health. If you experience pain, prolonged sensitivity, swelling, gum sensitivity, swollen lymph nodes, or fever, give our Worcester office a call or consult your general dentist. You may then be referred to Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants for specialized treatment at Central New England Endodontics and Implantology.

What are the alternatives to endodontic treatment?

August 5th, 2020

You have been recommended to Central New England Endodontics and Implantology for an endodontic treatment — commonly known as a root canal — and now you may be wondering if there are any alternatives to this procedure? Before discussing other options, it’s important to understand exactly what this common procedure accomplishes.

What is the purpose of an endodontic treatment?

Endodontic treatment is done when a tooth’s pulp — the inside of the tooth that houses the nerves and blood vessels — becomes infected or inflamed. In order to eliminate any pain and save the tooth, the damaged pulp is removed, the area is cleaned, and the tooth is sealed.

What are my other options?

According the American Association of Endodontics (AAE), the alternative to endodontic treatment is usually the complete removal the damaged tooth. If you have a tooth extracted, the AAE recommends replacing it with a dental implant, a bridge, or a removable partial denture. Failure to replace the extracted tooth could result in problems with chewing and biting, shifts in your remaining teeth, and self-consciousness.

Here are more details on the most common types of tooth replacements:

  • Dental implants – According to the American Dental Association, dental implants are effective and common options for replacing teeth. The implant is made from materials that are compatible with the human mouth and the device includes an artificial tooth. The placement of the implant and artificial tooth can be completed in one day, although some patients may need to wait up to several months before an artificial tooth can be added to the implant.
  • Bridges – Bridges do exactly what their name suggests: they bridge the space left by one or two missing teeth. Your dentist will bond the bridge to your remaining, natural teeth in order to keep it in place. Bridges can only be removed or put in place by a dentist.
  • Removable partial denture – Much like bridges, removable partial dentures are made up of replacement teeth that attach to your natural teeth. These, however, may be removed and replaced by the patient on a daily basis.

The AAE notes that dental implants have the same success rates as endodontic treatments. Even so, nothing can fully replace the look, capabilities, or the feel of your own teeth, which is why endodontic treatment (preserving the natural tooth) with Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants is an important decision!

Don't hesitate to contact our Worcester office if you have further questions!

How to Handle an Unexpected Dental Emergency

July 29th, 2020

Regardless of the type of dental emergency you experience, it is important that you visit Central New England Endodontics and Implantology for emergency dental care as soon as possible. A chipped or cracked tooth requires professional attention, as bacteria may gather in these areas, potentially causing infection that could require a root canal. Remember, you may be capable of managing pain, bleeding, and swelling at home, but by visiting our office for immediate treatment, you can fight infections and minimize lasting damage to your mouth, teeth, and gums under the expert care of our emergency dentist.

24/7 Emergency Dental Care

Central New England Endodontics and Implantology is proud to offer emergency dental care around the clock, seven days a week. Dental emergencies do not wait for regular business hours, and if you experience a serious dental emergency, you need immediate treatment. Whether you have a broken tooth or if you have bitten through your tongue, do not hesitate to visit us day or night. Until you arrive at our office, however, there are some helpful steps you can take if you encounter a serious dental dilemma.

Managing Your Dental Emergency

If a toothache is causing problems, you can probably keep the discomfort under control until our emergency doctor can treat you. Start by checking the gums that surround the affected tooth for inflammation, bleeding, or foreign objects. There may be food lodged in the gum that could be removed by flossing. You can control pain by placing a cold compress against your mouth, or by using an over-the-counter oral numbing agent.

More serious situations may be extremely time sensitive, and require immediate emergency attention. For example, if a tooth is completely knocked out, carefully clean it with water. Try to place the tooth back into its socket or briefly store it in a cup of milk if it will not fit back into the gum. Never pick up a tooth by the root or force it into the socket. Come straight to our office, as your tooth will need to be replaced within a short amount of time. Similarly, if you have bitten through your lip or tongue, the American Dental Association recommends carefully cleaning the area before coming as quickly as you can to our emergency dental office for treatment.

Remember, there is no reason you should live with discomfort. By visiting our Worcester office immediately in an emergency, you can take control of your oral health comfortably and safely.

Endodontists Can Save Teeth

July 22nd, 2020

An endodontist is a dental specialist who concentrates on root canals, or procedures involving the soft inner tissues of the teeth, otherwise known as the pulp. This type of doctor has gone through extensive training and extra years of schooling to be able to complete these procedures effectively.

You will be referred to an endodontist such as Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants if you’re in need of a root canal, or other specific procedures necessitated by a problem tooth. Nowadays, endodontists have the ability to avoid extraction altogether and save your natural tooth by restoring it to a healthy state.

Getting a root canal may not be on the top of your list of fun things to do, but it can make it possible for your endodontist to save a problem tooth if the pulp has become infected with bacteria. During this surgery, Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants will remove the infection from the root of the tooth, clean and fill the area, then seal it so bacteria can no longer get inside. Finally, a crown is placed on top of the tooth to prevent damage from occurring down the road.

Sometimes, additional treatment is necessary after a root canal, if you continue to experience pain in the area where the root canal took place. Inflammation and pain that persists after an initial root canal may mean the infection has spread to the bony area that surrounds the tooth.

This can occur if the tooth has experienced trauma, decay, or the crown has been cracked since the surgery. A root-end resection will fix these issues by opening the irritated gum tissues, then removing the infection and filling in the space. It’s unlikely that you will experience more problems following a root-end resection.

Endodontists such as Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants have the ability to save and restore problem teeth. When it comes to your oral health, being able to avoid a tooth extraction can be extremely relieving. If you think you may need a root canal, or notice recurring pain in your mouth, don’t hesitate to schedule an appointment at our Worcester office.

Endodontic Surgery: Is There a Dress Code?

July 15th, 2020

If you’re scheduled for endodontic surgery at our Worcester office in the near future, you probably have a lot of very important questions:

  • Will it help? An endodontist has the skill and experience to diagnose and treat conditions affecting your inner tooth, the pulp of the tooth, and the tissues surrounding the root. Endodontists are the experts in this specialty, so you are in good hands!
  • Will it hurt? Your endodontist will offer you options for anesthesia, so you can choose the sedation experience which will make you most comfortable.
  • What should I do after surgery? Don’t worry! Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants will give you clear instructions on caring for the surgical site, selecting soothing diet options, cleaning your mouth, and all of the other practices that will enable a speedy and smooth recovery.
  • What should I wear? Wait—fashion questions?

Yes! Part of being prepared for your surgery is being as comfortable as you can be during and after the procedure. Happily, there is no strict dress code for endodontic surgery. It’s more a basic list of recommendations for what not to wear.

  • Don’t wear something you’re not comfortable in. Generally, loose fitting clothing is best.
  • Don’t wear clothing that might be difficult to clean. While you and your clothing will be well protected, blood, irrigation, and other staining hazards are all occasionally part of the surgical process.
  • Don’t wear something that will be difficult to remove after surgery. No one wants to struggle out of a tight turtleneck even at the best of times!
  • Don’t wear jewelry. And, by the way, this includes tongue and facial piercings.
  • Don’t be afraid to layer. While the office staff will try to make sure you are as warm or as cool as you would like to be, it’s a good idea to bring a jacket or sweater for extra warmth.
  • Don’t wear tight sleeves. Short sleeves or sleeves that can be rolled up easily allow access to your arm if you are having IV sedation or blood pressure monitoring.
  • Don’t wear contact lenses, especially if you are planning on IV sedation or a general anesthetic, because your eyes might be closed throughout the procedure.

If you have any questions in advance of your endodontic surgery, give our Worcester office a call. Planning ahead is always in fashion!

Meet Dr. Kaplan

July 14th, 2020

Central New England Endodontics and Implantology is excited to announce that we have a new doctor joining our team! Let us introduce you to Dr. Kaplan, specializing in Root Canal Therapy.

Dr. Kaplan has been practicing in Rhode Island and Massachusetts for over 22 years. He has had the honor of being selected as America’s top dentist in the field of endodontics for the past 16 years in a row. Dr. Kaplan also served as a clinical instructor and professor at Tufts University and Boston University School of Dental Medicine where he taught post-graduate residents. Currently, he runs the endodontics department and teaches the AEDG residents at U. Mass Memorial Hospital.

We can’t wait for you to meet Dr. Kaplan!

Our Latest Office Updates

July 13th, 2020

Happy July from Central New England Endodontics and Implantology. We hope everyone is having a safe and wonderful start to the summer. If you weren’t already aware our office reopened on May 18, 2020, so we are ready to see you.

Before you arrive at your appointment there are a few new health implementations to be aware of. If you are a new patient, you can access the new patient forms on our website and fill them out prior to coming in. We ask all patients to bring and wear a face covering. Additionally, standard COVID questions will be asked when scheduling an appointment and again upon checking in. Your temperature will be taken upon arrival.

We ask that patients come alone and if that is not possible, we kindly ask that any accompanying people present wait in their car or come back to pick up the patient after the appointment. This helps us limit the number of people in the office and stick to social distancing measures. We thank each and every one of you for your cooperation during this time!

So far, with the new health implementations, we have received positive feedback from patients regarding visits and our new procedures to keep everyone safe and healthy. We do everything in our power to make sure your time with us is safe and comfortable so that you leave our office feeling satisfied.

If you are experiencing tooth discomfort or have questions about our procedures please give us a call to learn how we can help you. We hope to see you soon!

Proper Brushing Techniques

July 8th, 2020

Brushing your teeth properly removes the food particles and bacteria that can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. However, you do not want to scrub your teeth or gums heavily. A heavy hand can lead to tooth and gum erosion, as Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants and our staff see all too often.

You should also use a soft bristle toothbrush to avoid damaging the surface of your teeth. Make sure the head of the brush fits in your mouth, because if it is too large you will not be able to reach all tooth surfaces. Follow these steps to ensure you are brushing properly.

  1. Use a small amount of toothpaste on your brush. The recommendation is a pea-sized amount or thin strip on the bristles.
  2. Hold your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the surface of your teeth, angling towards your gums. Use a circular motion on all exterior tooth surfaces, and avoid back-and-forth “scrub” brushing.
  3. Once you have cleaned the outer surfaces, hold the brush vertically and clean the inner teeth surfaces — the side of your teeth that face your tongue. Do not forget the inner surfaces of your front teeth.
  4. Finally, finish by cleaning all the chewing surfaces of your teeth. You need to maintain a gentle touch, but make sure you get into the full depth of your molars. The entire process should take about two minutes.

Drs. Manzoli, Russo, Pauk, Desrosiers, Sahakyants and our staff recommend changing your toothbrush every three to four months for best results. Do not forget to clean your tongue, which helps remove excess bacteria from your mouth. Special brushes are available just for cleaning your tongue, and they are easy to use.

Proper care of your teeth also requires flossing on a regular basis. Flossing can be performed before or after you brush. Following up with a quality mouthwash will provide you with even more protection. Do not be afraid to ask the Central New England Endodontics and Implantology team for tips on proper brushing and flossing.

Welcome to Our Blog!

June 25th, 2020

Thank you for taking the time to visit our blog. Please check back often for weekly updates on fun and exciting events happening at our office, important and interesting information about orthodontics and the dental industry, and the latest news about our practice.

Feel free to leave a comment or question for our doctors and staff - we hope this will be a valuable resource for our patients, their families, and friends!